Worship Space Acoustics: 3 Decades of Design (Editors: Bradley, David T., Ryherd, Erica E., Ronsse, Lauren M)


Acoustics Professional, Author, Creator, Producer,  Springer-Verlag New York 2016,  

>400 copies sold, >1500 chapter downloads
____ viewers
____ page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

“This is a comprehensive compendium that far surpasses previous publications in the field in its depth, design, and information. Worship spaces of all major U.S. religions are covered. This book should be an obligatory reference for any consultant involved in church architecture and acoustics.”
-Mendel Kleiner

“All involved in their design will appreciate this presentation of recent rooms for religious worship.”
-Leo L. Beranek

“This very well-edited book, including the Editors’ Preface and six excellent essays from key people involved in worship space design, provides valuable information and ideas on the aesthetic, acoustic, and liturgical design of worship spaces for a number of faiths and in several countries.”
-Robert Coffeen


Print, On-Line


 


What is Diffraction? – ACOUSTICS


Acoustics Professional, Author, Creator, Producer,  YouTube, May 20, 2016,  

__926__ viewers of this video
__108755__ page views of the The Point Studios YouTube channel
__806__ subscribers
____ listeners

YouTube, can improve and inspire learning in acoustics and related fields by reaching a very broad audience. Currently, there aren’t very many YouTube videos focused on acoustics or that target such wide range of viewers. The video nominated explains diffraction both clearly and succinctly, while managing to be entertaining. This content is free and easily accessible worldwide and can be used both casually or in classroom settings. The video presents one aspect of sound and in so doing, introduces people to the field of acoustics. His channel covers a range of acoustic properties and he plans to continue creating acoustics themed videos.

A link to the video: https://youtu.be/ATl1MV20_Pk
A link to the channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/ThePointStudios


On-Line

https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/This-is-a-nomination-for-a-Science-Writing-Award-1.pdf


 


Making Noise and Hearing Things: A linguistics blog for the non-specialist


Acoustics Professional, Author, Creator,  Wordpress blog: https://makingnoiseandhearingthings.com/,  

(Figures between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2016)

132510 viewers
158629 page views

This blog has been active since 2012 but has only achieved wide reach (more than 50,000 readers a year) since 2015. It initially focused on introducing linguistics and acoustics concepts but has become much more popular since changing its focus to presenting original research and answering reader questions such as “how loud would a million dogs barking be?”. Research originally presented on the blog has been featured by publications such as the Daily Dot, New York Magazine’s The Science of Us and the Atlantic.


On-Line

https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/makingNoiseAndHearingThings_2017January4.zip


 


Sound Materials: A Compendium of Sound Absorbing Materials for Architecture and Design


Acoustics Professional, Author,  Frame Publishers. November 15, 2016,  

The first print is 3000 copies. The book is available in bookstores around the globe, Amazon.com, and directly from the publisher’s website

Sound Materials is a definitive resource for architects, designers and creative professionals — the first publication of its kind to catalogue over 100 sound absorbing materials with full colour images paired with inspiring real-world applications. Fundamental technical concepts are clearly and concisely presented to provide a general understanding of how materials absorb sound and how these materials are commonly used to reduce noise and reverberation, inform our sense of space, and improve communication in everyday environments. This book not only surveys an extensive range of materials past, present and emerging, but also highlights many exciting opportunities for future innovation and collaboration at the intersections of acoustical engineering, materials science, design and architecture. A special chapter is devoted to interviews with leading designers and engineers who work with sound absorbing materials in a variety of novel and innovative ways.


Print


 


Things that Go Bump in the Night. – The Physics of “False” Poltergeists


Acoustics Professional, Author,  (1) Sound and Vibration magazine, and (2) Academia.edu, April 2016.,  

____ viewers
____ page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

This subject is interesting to many people. Natural vibroacoustical phenomena that are often accredited to ghosts and other paraphysical causes are reviewed and explained. Acoustical and mechanical resonances, rattling windows and doors, the canyon effect, whispering galleries, remote noises and vibration propagation, and noise emission by structures under deformation are covered. Acoustical effects created by live ghosts (people and animals) are also discussed.


Print, Web

https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/Roman-Vinokur_Physics-of-False-Poltergeists.pdf


 


Half of the world’s farmed fish could have hearing loss


Journalist, Author,  Conservation Magazine 6-8-16,  

75,000/month____ viewers

Aquaculture, the world’s fastest growing means of food production, is currently responsible for producing more than 66 million metric tons of seafood each year. Similar farming systems are also used to restock depleted ecosystems for conservation purposes. But like terrestrial farming, aquaculture is not without its animal welfare concerns. Indeed, new research finds that perhaps half of the world’s farmed fish suffer from hearing impairments.


Online Website

Half of the world’s farmed fish could have hearing loss


 


The low-hanging fruit of marine conservation


Journalist, Author,  Conservation Magazine 10-14-15,  

75,000 monthly visitors

Most marine animals evolved in an ocean devoid of humans, but humans have gone and turned the ocean into a global shipping network, a military playground, and a recreational paradise. And those activities generate lots of noise.


Online Website

The low-hanging fruit of marine conservation


 


Building a Fence out of Sound


Journalist, Author,  Hakai Magazine 1-21-16,  

82,000 monthly visitors

Wherever human herds meet wild carnivores, conflict arises. And in these battles of life versus livelihood, it is almost always the predator that loses. Thomas Gӧtz, a marine mammalogist at the University of St Andrews, thinks there’s a better way to resolve these conflicts: loud noises.


Online Website
https://www.hakaimagazine.com/article-short/building-fence-out-sound


 


Humpback whales are being drowned out


Journalist, Author,  Hakai Magazine 1-19016,  

82,000 visitors/month

Each spring, eastern Australia’s humpback whales migrate south toward their summer feeding grounds in Antarctica. Like humpback whales around the world, this is a talkative bunch. The males sing out—haunting melodies that pierce through thousands of kilometers of seawater. Yet these songs are just one type of humpback communication. In addition, humpbacks will grunt and groan. They’ll bark and snort. They’ll use their bodies as mallets, slapping their tails or fins against the sea’s surface. Even the crash after a breach is thought to be a way of reaching out.

It’s an impressive communicative repertoire, but over the past century or so, whales have had an increasingly difficult time being heard. With their loud, banging motors, and twisting, thrumming propellers, ships generate noise that makes it difficult for these leviathans to keep in touch as they swim, forage, and mate.

For cetacean biologist Rebecca A. Dunlop, the next question became: which techniques do humpbacks use to overcome human noise pollution? The answer, as it turns out, is “none.”


Online Website
https://www.hakaimagazine.com/article-short/humpbacks-are-being-drowned-out


 


Monkey Talk


Journalist, Author,  Highlights for Children May 2016,  

____ viewers
____ page views
> 2 million subscribers
____ listeners

By studying animal communication, scientists get insights about the evolution of human language. Some species of titi monkeys are critically endangered. Understanding how they communicate may help save them.


Print

https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/Monkey-Talk.pdf


 


Listen To This Noise


Acoustics Professional, Author, Creator, Producer,  Tumblr (2013-Present),  

12000 Pageviews
39000 Notes (Likes, favorites, reblogs, etc)

Listen to this Noise is a single-topic blog on the topic of acoustics on Tumblr. Tumblr has a large community of young users, many of whom are interested in science and engineering (the so-called “Science side of tumblr”). LTTN’s goal is to engage that community and spread the knowledge of Acoustics as a field of study.


Online Website
http://listentothisnoise.com


 


Singing Ice: A Star Wars Story


Journalist, Creator, Producer,  NPR.org, 12/21/2016,  

813,773 video views (Facebook), 91,461 video views (YouTube)
77,033 page views
~ 100,000 listeners (estimate based on 12.4 million weekly All Things Considered listeners)

When a YouTube star wondered aloud about a strange sound coming from his local lake, NPR’s science production team — Skunk Bear — jumped in to explain acoustic dispersion. Ryan Kellman and Adam Cole created a quirky video that combines film and animation, along with a radio piece that was heard on NPR’s All Things Considered. This work of creative multimedia storytelling connects acoustics to popular culture and encourages public engagement with science through participation.


Online Video
http://www.npr.org/2016/12/21/506305383/why-does-a-frozen-lake-sound-like-a-star-wars-blaster


 


Construction and modernization of Kundun Pentatonic xylophone


Acoustics Professional, Author, Creator, Producer,  ASA and ASJ 5th Joint Meeting Honolulu,  

____ viewers
____ page views

This work is all about the constructional techniques and modernization of the resonant qualities of Kundun musical instrument from Birom in Plateau State of Nigeria. A discussion of the traditional Xylophone based on the field work conducted in Birom ethnic group understanding a kundun instrument maker, was made. The structure of this Xylophone highlights both the tone qualities and also the use of the cow-horn as pipes which amplifies the resonance of the slab. The construction and methods used here embodied traditional technology together with modern innovations, with the aim of improving the tone and aesthetic qualities of the instrument. This report also offered guides on the correct choice of wood and other materials for construction. Special attention was given to the acoustic behavior of kundun and the particular problems of the tropical climate conditions, to which the instrument could be exposed and to the overall tone quality of the instrument during performance. Some scientific approaches, in terms of the accurate measurements and amplification of sound, were taken into cognizance so as to enhance the knowledge of the construction of kundun musical instruments and its aesthetic quality.


Online Website
http://asa.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1121/1.4970573


 


Nature Podcast: Audiofile: Music and the making of science


Journalist, Author, Creator, Producer,  Nature Podcast, Audiofile series. Publication date: 12 March 2015,  

71,678 listens (= monthly average downloads per episode from RSS feed, 2015)
7049 page views of episode homepage on nature.com

Is music simply a pleasant accompaniment to thought, or a driving force behind it? This documentary examines music’s influence on the development of modern science and the foundations of acoustics, telling the story of Galileo’s father, Vincenzo Galilei, and his ground-breaking empirical demonstrations of theories of acoustics. To my knowledge, this was the first treatment of Vincenzo’s role in acoustic science outside of academic literature. It also explains, with tuneful examples, how other scientists used music as a muse. The episode was shortlisted in the Association of British Science Writers Awards 2016.


Radio, Online Website
http://www.nature.com/nature/podcast/index-audiofile-2015-03-12.html


 


Real life Dr. Dolittles


Journalist, Producer,  Nature Audiofile,  

There were 79,323 listens (of which 20,527 in first 48 hours)

This episode gained a large amount of listeners and managed to include some big personalities in the field of linguistics, namely Noam Chomsky and Shigeru Miyagawa.
It also married several fields of study together and used sounds recorded from the jungles of Borneo with self-recordings of a talking parrot (Griffin) at Harvard.


Radio
https://www.acast.com/nature/audiofile-reallifedrdolittles


 


Nature Podcast: Audiofile: What is it like to be a bat?


Journalist, Author, Creator, Producer,  Nature Podcast, Audiofile series. Publication date: 12 January 2015,  

71,678 listens (monthly average for episodes published in 2015)
6,483 page views on nature.com

In the 1970s, philosopher Thomas Nagel argued that we may never understand what another’s experience “is like”. He used the example of a bat, moving around using sound. For this episode, I focused on the acoustics and the neuroscience of echolocation, using the experiences of Fiona Gameson, a blind woman who has learned to echolocate, as a backbone for the episode. There was even room for some philosophical speculation, making this episode truly interdisciplinary in addition to telling a personal story.


Online Website
http://www.nature.com/nature/podcast/index-audiofile-2015-01-12.html


 


American Luthier: Carleen Hutchins—the Art and Science of the Violin


Journalist, Author,  ForeEdge, an imprint of University Press of New England, April 12, 2016 publication,  

____ viewers
____ page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

The first biography of Carleen Hutchins, the female pioneer who revolutionized violin acoustics and built the first violin octet.


Print
http://www.upne.com/1611685923.html
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/AMERICANLUTHIER.pdf


 


American Luthier: Carleen Hutchins—the Art and Science of the Violin


Journalist, Author,  University Press of New England, April 2016 publication,  

____ viewers
____ page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

The first biography of Carleen Hutchins, the female pioneer who revolutionized violin acoustics and built the first violin octet.


Print
http://www.upne.com/1611685923.html
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/9781611689273.pdf


 


Quiet: A Soldier’s Fight for the Most Silent Place in America


Journalist, Author,  Seattle Met Magazine, December 2016,  

____ viewers
____ page views
___50,069_ subscribers
____ listeners

This article reports on an often-overlooked health threat—noise pollution—and reflects on how quiet has become an ever-scarcer resource. The rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, are among the quietest places left in the continental United States, but quiet could easily be drowned out as the U.S. Navy moves forward with plans to expand flight paths over the region. To capture what is at stake, I tracked down those who are the most vulnerable: military veterans who suffer intense symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder when exposed to loud noise.


Print, Online Website

https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/1216_Quiet.pdf


 


An Overview of the ANSI/ASA Standards Program


Acoustics Professional, Author,  Sound & Vibration Magazine – 2015 December http://www.sandv.com/home.htm,  

n/a viewers
n/a page views
5322 subscribers
____ listeners

The ASA Standards program comprises over 500 volunteers dedicated to the purpose of creating and maintaining standards in the areas of acoustics, bioacoustics, shock and vibration, and noise, yet outside this group, its work and the standards development process remain relatively unknown. Examples of the practical benefits of acoustical standards for both participating organizations and end users are described. The voluntary consensus process from new work item proposal through final approval is detailed. The relationship between national and international standards bodies is explained. Information about how to participate in the standards process is also provided.


Print, Online Website
http://www.sandv.com/downloads/1512stru.pdf


 


Computation of acoustic fieldcoupled modes


Acoustics Professional, Author,  Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics 20, 070002 (2013);,  

____ viewers
____ page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

This work presents new equation for wave propagation problems and efficient numerical solution of one of difficult classic propagation problem.


Print
http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4864364
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/1.4864364.pdf


 


BBC Radio 4: Compression Verses Art


Journalist, Producer,  BBC Radio 4 7 Jan 2016,  

One million listeners is typical for the 11.30 midweek slot on BBC Radio 4

Does it matter that the public hears something different from the musicians in the studio? This radio programme examined the art and science of audio compression, reaching beyond audiophiles to the general public. Nick Holmes is passionate about sound and in recent years has produced half a dozen radio documentaries on acoustic science and audio technology. Nick came up the idea of Compression Verses Art, got it commissioned and was responsible for the production including the research, sourcing interviewees and recording interviews, developing the narrative and script (alongside the presenter), and editing.


Radio
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06tvgp1


 


Do-It-Yourself Acoustic Tractor Beam


Acoustics Professional, Author, Creator, Producer,  Instructables and APL,  

____ viewers
123,613 page views
909 subscribers
____ listeners

This is an Instructables that allows everyone to build their own acoustic tractor beam at home with components that cost less than 90$.

It is accompanying this paper: http://aip.scitation.org/doi/full/10.1063/1.4972407

We thing it is a good example of bringing things out of the laboratory and straight into the homes of everyone interested in getting into acoustic levitation. More generally, it allows to observe phenomena such as standing waves in a visual manner.

So we think it could be incorporated as one of the standard acoustic demonstrations.


Online Website, Online Video
https://www.instructables.com/id/Acoustic-Tractor-Beam/


 


Videos Share the Psychological Study of Language


Acoustics Professional, Author,  APS Observer – Published/posted: December 30, 2016 – see: https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/videos-share-the-psychological-study-of-language#.WNJ6KLGZORt,  

See about the APS Observer: https://www.psychologicalscience.org/about-the-aps-observer

“APS has approximately 33,000 members and includes the leading psychological scientists and academics, clinicians, researchers, teachers, and administrators.” (see: https://www.psychologicalscience.org/who_we_are)

As of March 22, 2017, the sum of the views of the videos in the series is 2,806.

The goal of the article was to bring attention to our recently produced video series – in order to make the psychology of language widely accessible. Speech communication is an important area of scientific inquiry within acoustics. The series consists of brief engaging videos featuring experts across the field. The videos can be easily viewed on electronic devices and shared on websites and social media outlets. The significance of the article is to increase the impact of the series by encouraging the 33,000 APS members to share the series with colleagues, students, and the general public.


Print, Online Website, Online Video
https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/videos-share-the-psychological-study-of-language#.WNJ-arGZORt


 


two articles: Sound Bytes and Boom! Sounding Out the Enemy


Journalist, Author,  Scientific American, March 2015; Science News for Students, Nov. 10, 2015,  

____ viewers
____ page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

This feature article for Scientific American illustrate how converting visual data into sound can lead to news discoveries in several branches of science, including astronomy and biomedicine. The feature story for Science News for Students show how using the principles of acoustics became crucial in locating the position of enemy aircraft during World War I. Note that I am submitting the Scientific American article by uploading a pdf and submitting the Science News for Students article by URL.


Print, Online Website
https://www.sciencenewsforstudents.org/article/boom-sounding-out-enemy
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/sound-bytes-Cowen.pdf


 


Smart People Behaving Foolishly: Lessons from a Career in Scientific Research


Acoustics Professional, Author, Creator, Producer,  Acoustics Today, Fall 2016, Volume 12, Issue 3,  

____ viewers
____ page views
7,000 subscribers
____ listeners

The focus of this article is on things I wish someone had told me when I was a young person embarking on a career in scientific research. Although the ideas
are aimed toward science and engineering, they are also relevant to life in general. The lessons I have learned have been valuable to me, but it would have been wonderful if I had not had to learn them via the “school of hard knocks.” By sharing lessons here, my hope is that at least a few people might be saved the trouble of learning them the hard way.


Print, Online Website

https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/AT_Fall_2016_Clark_Article.pdf


 


How Voice Pitch Influences Our Choice of Leaders


Acoustics Professional, Author,  American Scientist magazine, September-October 2016,  

____ viewers
____ page views
__100,000__ subscribers
____ listeners

In an election season, prospective voters take their impressions of the candidates not only from what they say but also on the basis of other aspects of their presentation, such as intonation, gestures, and appearance. Recent studies have identified another trait that contributes subtly but significantly to voters’ impressions: the pitch of a candidate’s voice. In “How Voice Pitch Influences Our Choice of Leaders,” political scientist Casey Klofstadt and biologists Stephen Nowicki and Rindy Anderson describe their interdisciplinary research, which attempts to weigh the effect of a high- or low-pitched voice on a candidate’s electoral success.


Print, Online Website
http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/id.16525,y.2016,no.5,content.true,page.1,css.print/issue.aspx
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/2016-09Klofstad.pdf


 


The Acoustic World of Harbor Porpoises


Acoustics Professional, Author,  American Scientist magazine, January-February 2016,  

____ viewers
____ page views
100,000____ subscribers
____ listeners

Wahlberg and his colleagues explore the concept of Umwelt—the comprehensive picture of the world an animal forms from all of its senses—as it relates to the acoustic abilities of the harbor porpoise. They have been studying the animals in captivity since 1997 and were the first to successfully raise a new calf. This close connection has allowed them to tease out details of how the animals produce sounds, as well as how they hear and echolocate simultaneously. They discuss the application of their work to reducing the chances of porpoises getting caught in fishing nets.
PLEASE NOTE: A connected video and animation is here: http://www.americanscientist.org/science/pub/behind-the-porpoises-echolocation


Print, Online Website, Online Video
http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/id.16291,y.2015,no.1,content.true,page.1,css.print/issue.aspx
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/2015-01Wahlberg.pdf


 


Do Humans Possess a Second Sense of Hearing?


Acoustics Professional, Author,  American Scientist magazine, September-October 2015,  

____ viewers
____ page views
_100,000___ subscribers
____ listeners

Before the evolution of the cochlea that centers our auditory system, organisms evolved another organ called an otolith, which probably originally developed to help aquatic organisms determine up from down. Todd discusses the otolith’s evolution, how it is used in hearing, and how we still have a similar device at the center of our vestibular system, which helps us balance. Understanding the otolith could help with diseases of the vestibular system, which are so debilitating that sufferers can’t even stand up.


Print, Online Website
http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/feature/2015/5/do-humans-possess-a-second-sense-of-hearing
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/2015-09Todd.pdf


 


Audiofile: Health under the flightpath


Journalist, Acoustics Professional, Creator, Producer,  www.nature.com/nature/podcast 02/10/2015,  

2705 page views of episode homepage on nature.com
71,678 listens (= downloads from RSS feed. Monthly average per episode published in 2015)

Retired air stewardess Wendy Halanan loves aircraft, but could the noise they make be damaging her heart? Noise is irritating and distracting to many, but new research is pointing to more sinister impacts. In this podcast I explore whether noise might be hurting Wendy and others exposed to it – and if so what we might do about it.


Radio, Online Website
https://www.acast.com/nature/3a20603d-8496-45da-8939-af18f2ef8f8c


 


Speech forensics: when Hollywood seldom mirrors real-life court cases


Journalist, Author,  http://www.euroscientist.com/,  

70,000 viewers per year
5,000 pageviews per month
16,000 subscribers to the newsletter mailing list (free)

This article is part of an investigative journalism project on forensic speech science (FSS): http://journalismfund.eu/hearingvoices. It relies on a database of controversial judicial cases involving FSS. It shows statistical evidence of the presence of charlatans in courts, and of the use of outdated statistics. It displays division between supporters of semi-automated and automated methods. Finally, it tracks the unsuccessful efforts of the European Union to make order in the field.


Online Website

Speech forensics: when Hollywood seldom mirrors real-life court cases


 


The Reading Machine


Acoustics Professional, Author, Creator,  Medium.com, December 31, 2016,  

____ viewers
952 page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

This is an article for a general audience about a set of experiments carried out at the Haskins Lab in the wake of World War II that intended to help blind veterans learn to read with “acoustic alphabets”. The prototypes failed, but the researchers discovered fundamental principles of speech acoustics that essentially modernized the field. This article was circulated by readers on social media, including Facebook and Tumblr, as well as on ScienceWire.com, a science news aggregator. It includes a video demonstration, created by the author, of the early technology meant to enable listeners to “read” by sound.


Online Website
View story at Medium.com


 


Our ability to speak doesn’t begin with our first words. It begins in the womb.


Journalist, Author, Creator, Producer,  Public Radio International’s “The World,” 3 March 2016,  

[n/a] viewers
* 181 page views
[n/a] subscribers
* 3 million listeners

This radio story considers the unexpected notion that the first steps in language learning start inside the womb. We interviewed a Finn and a Canadian about their research exploring the role that in utero exposure to a language’s rhythm and pitch plays in a baby’s development. We decided to run this story because it offered listeners a surprising and memorable take on a phenomenon they are familiar with, making the field of linguistic acoustics relevant and accessible to them.


Radio
https://www.pri.org/stories/2016-03-03/our-ability-speak-doesnt-begin-our-first-words-it-begins-womb


 


The physics of peacock twerking


Journalist, Author, Creator, Producer,  Science News,  

__6000__ viewers
____ page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

This video breaks down the physics behind the male peacock’s mating dance, specifically the acoustics at play when they vibrate their tail feathers. The goal was to take a complex finding and showcase its significance to the general audience on YouTube.


Online Video


 


Ground vibration boom – the phenomenon to be reckoned with when developing HS2 high-speed lines


Acoustics Professional, Author,  Rail Professional, 2016, May issue, pp. 69-70.,  

____ viewers
_ x_ page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

This article is addressed to railway professionals – engineers and business planners. It briefly explains the implications of the phenomenon of ‘ground vibration boom’ for development of future high-speed railway lines, in particular for the proposed HS2 high-speed railway network in the UK. The article suggests that the proposed HS2 routes should be thoroughly investigated on Rayleigh wave velocities before any construction works have started. Such investigations would reveal sensitive locations, with low values of Rayleigh wave velocities, where the occurrence of ground vibration boom and of the closely related bow wave effect is likely.


Online Website

https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/Krylov-Rail-Professional-May-2016.pdf


 


Acoustic holograms


Journalist, Author, Creator, Producer,  Nature YouTube Channel, 9/21/2016,  

76301 viewers

Acoustic holograms are bizarre three-dimensional patterns that can be formed by vibrations in the air. In this video, we take a look at a ground breaking approach to creating these holograms, using a 3D printed hologram disk to levitate water droplets and propel small objects.

This is an update on a previous story on ‘ultrasonic levitation’, and in this video we not only explain how the new technology works, but also clearly explain how it advances the previous approach. Despite the abstract and
complex subject matter, this film reached over 75,000 viewers and received over 98% positive feedback.


Video, Online Video


 


Ultrasonic Levitation


Journalist, Creator, Producer,  Nature, 27th October 2017 – published on nature.com and youtube.com/naturevideochannel,  

107,351 views
175,123 subscribers to Nature Video Channel

Nature Video interviewed scientist Asier Marzo in his lab where he demonstrated the latest development in acoustic levitation. The new research used virtual holograms to create acoustic structures that can manipulate small objects. Significantly, this levitation and manipulation was achieved using a single-sided array.

While the original research was published in Nature Communications, this short film was published through Nature Magazine’s various channels, gaining over a hundred thousand views on youtube – including many from shares on Facebook and Reddit.


Online Video


 


Ultrasonic Levitation


Journalist, Creator, Producer,  Nature, 27th October 2017 – published on nature.com and youtube.com/naturevideochannel,  

107,351 views
175,123 subscribers to Nature Video Channel

Nature Video interviewed scientist Asier Marzo in his lab where he demonstrated the latest development in acoustic levitation. The new research used virtual holograms to create acoustic structures that can manipulate small objects. Significantly, this levitation and manipulation was achieved using a single-sided array.

While the original research was published in Nature Communications, this short film was published through Nature Magazine’s various channels, gaining over a hundred thousand views on youtube – including many from shares on Facebook and Reddit.


Online Video


 


The Man Who Opened Our Ears to the Ocean


Journalist, Author, Creator, Producer,  WHOI’s Oceanus Magazine, 3 September 2015,  

[n/a] viewers
4,400 page views
[n/a] subscribers
[n/a] listeners

This video is an homage to the late William Watkins (oceanographer emeritus, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution), highlighting his enormous contributions to underwater bioacoustics. It combines archival interview material, original audio recordings of marine mammals, and a new interview with Peter Tyack — a leader in the field today. Watkins created some of the first equipment for listening to sound underwater and the resulting archive democratizes online access for all in perpetuity.


Online Video
http://www.whoi.edu/oceanus/feature/william-watkins


 


Snapping shrimps make less noise in acidifying oceans


Journalist, Producer,  New Scientist magazines, 16 March 2016,  

5 million unique monthly page views
110,000 subscribers

The article describes how a commonly known problem of global climate change will affect an intriguing aspects of ocean acoustics. Therefore it links climate change with acoustics in a fun and entertaining way.


Print, Online Website
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2080953-snapping-shrimps-make-less-noise-in-acidifying-oceans/Snapping%20shrimps%20make%20less%20noise%20in%20acidifying%20oceans
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/Snapping-shrimps-make-less-noise-in-acidifying-oceans-New-Scientist.pdf


 


Ocean commotion: Protecting sea life from our noise


Journalist, Producer,  New Scientist magazines, 16 March 2016,  

5 million unique monthly page views
110,000 subscribers
30,000 weekly newsstand sales

This was a major and timely journalistic investigation into the changing aspects of ocean acoustics, thanks mainly to human activity, and how that affects ecosystems and living organisms in the world’s seas.


Print, Online Website
https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22630161-200-ocean-commotion-protecting-sea-life-from-our-noise/
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/Ocean-commotion-Protecting-sea-life-from-our-noise-New-Scientist.pdf


 


Fish recorded singing dawn chorus on reefs just like birds


Journalist, Author, Producer,  New Scientist magazines, 21 September 2016,  

5 million monthly unique page views
110,000 subscribers
30,000 weekly newsstand sales

This short and snappy news story took a technical journal article from Bioacoustics, DOI: 10.1080/09524622.2016.1227940 and turned it into a fun popular science piece that went viral online, getting >250,000 views in the first fews days after posting, as well as 3,000 shares on social media. It took an aspect of acoustics people know about – the bird dawn chorus – and explained how a similar phenomenon exists undersea, and backed it up with the actual sound clip embedded in the story. It was a great idea that improved ordinary people’s understanding of acoustics in a fun and approachable way, while at the same time teaching them something new about marine life and biology.


Print, Online Website
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2106331-fish-recorded-singing-dawn-chorus-on-reefs-just-like-birds/
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/Fish-recorded-singing-dawn-chorus-on-reefs-just-like-birds-New-Scientist.pdf


 


Giraffes spend their evenings humming to each other


Journalist, Author, Producer,  New Scientist magazine, 17 September 2015,  

5 million monthly unique page views
110,000 subscribers
30,000 weekly newsstand sales

Who knew? The story reveals a new aspect of an acoustic behaviour of an iconic animal species everyone has heard of, making the issue relatable and intriguing. It goes on to suggest that this newly found humming behaviour may explain a local mystery/urban myth in England. The story mixes in fun facts, new scientific research, photos and sound clips into one neat, fun and informational package that was extremely popular online and copied by many other media.


Print, Online Website
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2058123-giraffes-spend-their-evenings-humming-to-each-other/
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/Giraffes-spend-their-evenings-humming-to-each-other-New-Scientist.pdf


 


Wild gorillas compose happy songs that they hum during meals


Journalist, Author, Producer,  New Scientist magazine, 24 February 2016,  

5 million monthly unique page views
110,000 subscribers
30,000 weekly newsstand sales

This story reported for the first time new singing sounds made by some of our closest evolutionary relatives, gorillas. They sing when they eat and they do so to express happiness, it seems. The story is a fun take on acoustics in nature, showing us something new about the behaviour of these majestic animals. It included pictures and sound clips and was another online hit with some 1,300 shares on social media and hundreds of thousands of online hits. People love stories about animals sounds, it seems.


Print, Online Website
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2078781-wild-gorillas-compose-happy-songs-that-they-hum-during-meals/
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/Wild-gorillas-compose-happy-songs-that-they-hum-during-meals-New-Scientist.pdf


 


Birds sing to their unborn chicks to warn them about hot weather


Journalist, Author, Producer,  New Scientist magazine, 18 August 2016,  

5 million monthly unique page views
110,000 subscribers
30,000 weekly newsstand sales

This story is a fascinating account linking acoustics of bird song to changes in climate. It resolves the mystery of why some birds sing while sitting on eggs – the eggs can actually hear them and change their behaviour once hatched based on those sounds! It’s written in an informative way, breaking down difficult science into easy to understand prose.


Print, Online Website
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2101681-birds-sing-to-their-unborn-chicks-to-warn-them-about-hot-weather/
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/Birds-sing-to-their-unborn-chicks-to-warn-them-about-hot-weather-New-Scientist.pdf


 


German title:
Klangökologie: Die Symphonien der Natur (German multimedia piece; I am sending the English translation as well as a pdf)

English title:
Soundscape Ecology: The Symphonies of Nature


Journalist, Author, Creator, Producer,  FAZ.net (web site of the German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung),  

45 million viewers (the newspaper web site has about 45 million viewers per month)
100,000 page views (the project I am submitting had approximately that many page views)

This is a massive, 6,000-word web-based multimedia project with over 70 videos and an interactive world map. It’s about an emerging research field called soundscape ecology, where researchers study soundscapes of entire habitats to better understand ecosystems, and how they are affected by environmental damage and human noise. The project’s most innovative aspect—a first in journalism—is the large-scale use of visualized soundscapes in the form of spectrograms. The author used them to overcome the fact that most people are dominated by their visual sense.


Online Website, Online Video
http://www.faz.net/aktuell/wissen/natursymphonie-so-knistert-ein-korallenriff-13957242.html
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/English-Translation-FAZ-soundscape-ecology-multimedia-project.pdf


 


Zoologger: The tiny insects that roar at each other like lions


Journalist, Producer,  New Scientist, 28 August 2015,  

5 million monthly unique page views
110,000 subscribers
30,000 weekly newsstand sales

This story dives into the acoustic world of tiny insects, inaudible to humans without the use of specialised technology. But amplify those sounds and you hear amazing things – calls of these creatures are reminiscent in sound and functions to roars of lions. Th.t’s pretty cool, and this story conveyed it by explaining a technical paper in clear langauge with use of pictures and videos with sound,


Print, Online Website
https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn28110-zoologger-the-tiny-insects-that-roar-at-each-other-like-lions/
https://acousticalsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/6/Zoologger-The-tiny-insects-that-roar-at-each-other-like-lions-New-Scientist.pdf


 


Science Update (Series)


Journalist, Author, Creator, Producer,  Syndicated and heard via NPR, PRX and on commercial talk news via Westwood One media’s news show America in the Morning,  

____ viewers
____ page views
____ subscribers
Over one million on air and 50,000 via podcast- listeners

Science Update is the longest running national science show on commercial and public radio, and is heard by an audience of over one million each day. Its primary audience is talk news radio listeners across the country– listeners of Sean Hannity, Mark Levin and Rush Limbaugh– a group largely ignored by science media. Science Update is also heard via NPR, on Armed Forces Radio and via radio news services for the blind. The show frequently covers acoustics-related topics, including many stories from the annual meeting of the Acoustical Society of America. The three included are a small sample. They are:
Vibrating Insects
Vocal Fry
Hospital Noise


Radio
http://www.scienceupdate.com/2015/11/fly-4/%20;%20http://www.scienceupdate.com/2016/05/vocal-fry/%20;%20http://www.scienceupdate.com/2016/06/hospital-noise-3/


 


Unscripted Science Series


Journalist, Author, Creator, Producer,  Unscripted: Science and Engineering Research (Michigan Tech),  

_100,000+___ viewers (through Michigan Tech communication channels)
____ page views
____ subscribers
____ listeners

This is a four-part series including two news stories, an audio postcard on our Unscripted blog, and guest blog featuring work from Dr. Andrew Barnard’s acoustics lab at Michigan Tech. In such a visually focused digital era, we wanted people to hear cutting edge research. Most people never get to listen under the ice, ride a NOAA ship, or step inside an anechoic chamber; we wanted to bring that experience directly to their ears. Dr. Barnard also has an active outreach grant with the US Navy to recruit future acoustics engineers, an audience we hoped to inspire through our work.


Print, Radio, Online Website
http://www.mtu.edu/unscripted/stories/2016/july/sound-ships-science.html