Fall 2014 Meeting

Indianapolis Indiana

 

  Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel
Indianapolis, Indiana

27–31 October 2014Indianapolis

Photo courtesy of Conrad Piccirillo

 

  

 

Itinerary Planner - Meeting Calendar and Abstracts

Registration - Preregistration Deadline has Passed

Program in PDF format

Schedule of Committee Meetings and Other Events

Make Hotel Reservation - Reservation deadline has passed

Call for Papers (in PDF Format)

Student Social Media - follow Twitter @acousticsorg 
For this meeting use #ASA168 on Twitter and Instagram

 

Overview

The 168th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America will be held Monday through Friday, 27–31 October 2014 at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. A block of rooms has been reserved at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel at discounted rates.

 

Technical Events and Information

Technical Sessions and Technical Session Designations

Visit the Itinerary Planner to create your own meeting itinerary. The planner includes the list of sessions, abstracts, and other events. The technical program includes 92 sessions with 948 papers scheduled for presentation during the meeting.

Session Chairs have been instructed to adhere strictly to the printed time schedule, both to be fair to all speakers and to permit attendees to schedule moving from one session to another to hear specific papers. If an author is not present to deliver a lecture-style paper, the Session Chairs have been instructed either to call for additional discussion of papers already given or to declare a short recess so that subsequent papers are not given ahead of the designated times.Several sessions are scheduled in poster format, with the display times indicated in the program schedule.

The first character is a number indicating the day the session will be held, as follows:

  • 1-Monday, 27 October
  • 2-Tuesday, 28 October
  • 3-Wednesday, 29 October
  • 4-Thursday, 30 October
  • 5-Friday, 31 October

The second character is a lower case “a” for a.m., “p” for p.m., or “e” for evening corresponding to the time of day the session will take place. The third and fourth characters are capital letters indicating the primary Technical Committee that organized the session using the following abbreviations or codes:

  • AA Architectural Acoustics
  • AB Animal Bioacoustics
  • AO Acoustical Oceanography
  • BA Biomedical Acoustics
  • EA Engineering Acoustics
  • ED Education in Acoustics
  • ID Interdisciplinary
  • MU Musical Acoustics
  • NS Noise
  • PA Physical Acoustics
  • PP Psychological and Physiological Acoustics
  • SA Structural Acoustics and Vibration
  • SC Speech Communication
  • SP Signal Processing in Acoustics
  • UW Underwater Acoustics

In sessions where the same group is the primary organizer of more than one session scheduled in the same morning or afternoon, a fifth character, either lower-case “a” or “b” is used to distinguish the sessions. Each paper within a session is identified by a paper number following the session-designating characters, in conventional manner. As hypothetical examples: paper 2pEA3 would be the third paper in a session on Tuesday afternoon organized by the Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee; 3pSAb5 would be the fifth paper in the second of two sessions on Wednesday afternoon sponsored by the Structural Acoustics and Vibration Technical Committee.

Note that technical sessions are listed both in the calendar and the body of the program in the numerical and alphabetical order of the session designations rather than the order of their starting times. For example, session 3aAA would be listed ahead of session 3aAO even if the latter session began earlier in the same morning.

Open Meetings of Technical Committees

Technical Committees will hold open meetings on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at the times and rooms listed in the Itinerary Planner. These are working, collegial meetings. Much of the work of the Society is accomplished by actions that originate and are taken in these meetings including proposals for special sessions, workshops and technical initiatives. All meeting participants are cordially invited to attend these meetings and to participate actively in the discussions.

Rossing Prize in Acoustics Education and Education in Acoustics Prize Lecture

The 2014 Rossing Prize in Acoustics Education will be awarded to Colin Hansen, University of Adelaide, at the Plenary Session on Wednesday, 29 October. Colin Hansen will present the Acoustics Education Prize Lecture titled “Educating mechanical engineers in the art of noise control” on Wednesday, 29 October, at 2:00 p.m. in Session 3pED in Indiana C/D.

Hot Topics

A “Hot Topics” session 3pID, sponsored by the Tutorials Committee, will be held on Wednesday, 29 October, in Indiana E at 1:00 p.m. Papers will presented on current topics in the fields of Acoustical Oceanography, Education in Acoustics, and Signal Processing in Acoustics.

Undergraduate Research Exposition

The 2014 Undergraduate Research Exposition will be held Tuesday, 28 October, 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. in session 2aED in Marriott 6. This session is a forum for undergraduate students to present their research pertaining to any area of acoustics and can also include overview papers on undergraduate research programs, designed to inspire and foster growth of undergraduate research throughout the Society. It is intended to encourage undergraduates to express their knowledge and interest in acoustics and foster their participation in the Society.

Four awards, up to $500 each, will be made to help undergraduates with travel costs associated with attending the meeting and presenting a poster.

Gallery of Acoustics

The Technical Committee on Signal Processing in Acoustics will sponsor the 15th Gallery of Acoustics at the Acoustical Society of America meeting in Indianapolis, IN. Its purpose is to enhance ASA meetings by providing a setting for researchers to display their work to all meeting attendees in a forum emphasizing the diversity, interdisciplinary, and artistic nature of acoustics. The Gallery of Acoustics provides a means by which we can all share and appreciate the natural beauty, aesthetic, and artistic appeal of acoustic phenomena: This is a forum where science meets art.

The Gallery will be held in the Marriott Ballroom Foyer, Monday through Thursday, 27-30 October, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Technical Tours

Space is limited on many of these tours, so sign up at the time that you register for the meeting online at AcousticalSociety.org. Buses leave from the Missouri Street exit at the Marriott. Start times are when the bus leaves the hotel, so plan on being there ahead of time.

Monday, 27 October 6:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Tour and Tutorial Lecture at the Hilbert Circle Theater, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Tour fees: USD $15 for non-students/No fee for students.
Prior to becoming the home of the Indianapolis Symphony, Hilbert Circle Theater was a movie house. It underwent major revisions to make it suitable as a concert hall. Tour starts at 6:00 p.m. and tutorial presentation starts at 7:00 p.m. The Theater is half a mile walking distance (about 15 minutes from the hotel). See the Tutorial Lecture section below for full details.

Tuesday, 28 October: 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon. Tour of the Center for the Performing Arts, 355 City Center Drive, Carmel. Tour limited to 30 participants. Tour fee: USD $25.
The Center for Performing Arts houses the Palladium (1,600 seat concert hall), the Tarkington Theater (500 seats proscenium stage) and the Studio Theater (small flexible black box space). This is a recently completed facility north of Indianapolis. The Palladium is a space that rivals the world’s great concert halls. David M. Schwarz Architects, a Washington, DC based architectural firm, drew inspiration for the Palladium from the famous Villa Capra “La Rotunda” (or Villa Rotunda) built in 1566 in Italy and designed by Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580). For more information about the Center visit www.thecenterfortheperformingarts.org.

Thursday, 30 October:  3:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. Tour of 3M Acoustics Facilities, 7911 Zionsville Road, Indianapolis. Tour limited to 30 participants. Tour fee: USD $25
Elliott Berger and Steve Sorenson will give tours of 3M’s E•A•RCAL hearing protection laboratory and Acoustic Technology Center (ATC) laboratory for noise control research and application. The E•A•RCAL facility consists of a NVLAP accredited 113-m3 reverberation chamber instrumented for real-ear attenuation testing, an 18-m3 electroacoustic sound lab supporting high-level tests up to 120 dB SPL, and a 300-m3 hemi-anechoic facility used for impulse testing via a shock tube that generates blasts up to 168 dB SPL for measuring the level-dependent performance of hearing protectors. The ATC includes a 900-m3 hemi-anechoic chamber with an inbuilt chassis dynamometer ideal for testing heavy trucks under real-world load conditions, a smaller hemi-anechoic chamber for product sound power testing, and 2 reverberation chambers for a wide variety of sound transmission loss and sound absorption test/development. Note that no photographs are allowed to be taken on this tour. Conference attendees who work for 3M/Aearo/E-A-R competitors may not be allowed to participate in the tour – the registration fee will be refunded in full should the request to participate (through pre-registration) not be approved.

International Student Challenge Problem in Acoustic Signal Processing - Entry Deadline has passed.

The Acoustical Society of America Technical Committee on Signal Processing in Acoustics is sponsoring an International Student Challenge Problem in Acoustic Signal Processing. This problem presents a real-world signal processing challenge encountered in the field of acoustics. It is intended to be easily understood by students with a basic understanding of signal processing. A unique solution to the Student Challenge Problem is not expected. Students are encouraged to explore various approaches. Submissions will be judged on clarity, creativity, rigor, and insight. The competition is open to both undergraduate and graduate students.

Cash awards of USD $500 and USD $250 will be awarded to the first and second place winners, respectively.  Winners are also invited (but not required) to prepare and present a 4’ x 8’ poster at the 168th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Indianapolis, Indiana, 27-31, October 2014. Limited support is available for travel to the meeting to the winning entrants.

The Problem

Background. A truck with a 4-stroke diesel engine travels along a straight road with constant speed. Near the road is a microphone that senses the radiated acoustic noise from the truck during its passage past the microphone. The output of the microphone is sampled at the rate of 12,000 samples/second and 30 seconds of data are recorded during the truck’s transit. During the recording of the data, the speed of sound propagation in air was a constant 347 m/s.

Problem:  Assuming that the truck is a point source,

  • Plot the spectrogram of the acoustic data file truck.wav.(right-click to download and "save file as")
  • Given that the strongest spectral line is the engine firing rate, calculate the truck’s
  • engine firing rate (in Hz),
  • cylinder firing rate (in Hz),
  • number of cylinders,
  • tachometer reading (in revolutions/minute),
  • speedometer reading (speed in km/hour),
  • distance (in meters) of the closest point of approach of the truck to the sensor,
  • time (in seconds) at which the closest point of approach occurs.

Your solution should detail your approach and reasoning to solve the problem, as well as your best estimates of the above parameters.

Entry Requirements and Deadline Dates
Send your solutions to asa@aip.orgby 31 July 2014 with the subject line “Student Challenge Problem Entry.”
Submissions should be electronic and in MS Word or PDF format. Your entry should include your name, preferred postal mailing address, e-mail address and mobile phone number.

Entries must be accompanied by proof of the entrant’s status as a university student, e.g., current student ID card or letter from the university confirming student status.  Entrants need not be members of the ASA. Winners will be selected by a panel appointed by the Chair of the Technical Committee on Signal Processing in Acoustics.
Entrants will be notified by of the competition results by 30 September 2014. Attendance at the ASA fall 2014 meeting is not required to participate.

By entering this competition you are granting ASA the right to post your answer on any of its web sites including, but not limited to, AcousticalSociety.org and AcousticsToday.org.

Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics (POMA)

The upcoming meeting of the Acoustical Society of America will have a published proceedings, and submission is optional. The proceedings will be a separate volume of the online journal, "Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics" (POMA). This is an open access journal, so that its articles are available in pdf format without charge to anyone in the world for downloading. Authors who are scheduled to present papers at the meeting are encouraged to prepare a suitable version in pdf format that will appear in POMA. The POMA online site for submission of papers from the meeting will be opened about the same time when authors are notified that their papers have been accepted for presentation. It is not necessary to wait until after the meeting to submit one's paper to POMA. Further information regarding POMA can be found online at scitation.aip.org Published papers from previous meetings can be seen online at scitation.aip.org.

A/V Preview Room

The Albany Room on the second floor will be set up as an A/V preview room for authors’ convenience, and will be available on Monday through Thursday from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.

ANSI Standards Committees

Meetings of ANSI Accredited Standards Committees will not be held at the Indianapolis meeting. Meetings of selected advisory working groups are often held in conjunction with Society meetings and are listed in the Intinerary Planner or on the standards bulletin board in the registration area, e.g., S12/WGI8-Room Criteria. People interested in attending and in becoming involved in working group activities should contact the ASA Standards Manager for further information about these groups, or about the ASA Standards Program in general, at the following address: Susan Blaeser, ASA Standards Manager, Standards Secretariat, Acoustical Society of America, 1305 Walt Whitman Road, Suite 300, Melville, NY 11747-4300; T.: 631-390-0215; F: 631-923-2875; E: asastds@aip.org

Meeting Program

A complete meeting program will be published as Part 2 of the October issue of JASA and is available here.

Audio-Visual and Special Equipment and Software

Audio-Visual Equipment

PC computers with audio playback capability, computer projectors, and laser pointers will be provided in all lecture sessions. All other equipment is considered to be special equipment. Refer to the “Special Equipment” section below for additional information. Note that Mac computers will not be provided,including stereo audio sound.

Special Equipment, Computer Equipment, and Software

Any equipment other than PC computers with audio playback capability, computer projectors, and laser pointers is “special equipment.”   Requests for special equipment must be specified at the time of abstract submission. Provision of unusual special equipment will depend upon availability and cost. Special software requests should also be made, if required.

Please be specific about your audio needs, including number of channels and preferred loudspeaker arrangement.

Poster Session Boards

Poster boards and fastening materials will be provided. If your poster needs to be located adjacent to a power outlet and/or you require the use of a table, please request these items when you submit your abstract.

Projection Guidelines for Authors

A PC computer with stereo playback capability and projector will be provided in each meeting room on which all authors who plan to use computer projection will load their presentations. Authors should bring computer presentations on a CD ROM or USB drive to load onto the provided computer and should arrive at the meeting rooms at least 30 minutes before the start of their sessions. Authors also have the option to connect their own laptops to the computer projector, however authors using their own laptops must also arrive at the meeting room at least 30 minutes before start of the session to setup this connection. Assistance in loading presentations onto the computers and switching to alternate computers will be provided.

If you utilize your own computer for your presentation you should bring copies of your presentation materials on CD ROM or a USB drive as a backup. This may solve any possible interface or cable problems between your computer and the projector.

Note that only PC format will be supported so authors using Macs must save their presentations for projection in PC format. Also, authors who plan to play audio during their presentations should insure that their sound files are also saved on the CD ROM or USB drive.

Guidelines for use of computer projection will be supplied with acceptance notices.

Audio/Visual Preview Room

Computer presentations can be reviewed by authors in the audio/visual preview room at the meeting.

Tutorial Lecture on Musical Acoustics: Science and Performance

 

A Tutorial Presentation on “Musical Acoustics:  Science and Performance” will be given by Professor Uwe J. Hansen of Indiana State University, and the New World Youth Symphony, directed by Susan Kitterman, on Monday, 27 October 2014 at 7:00 p.m. in the Hilbert Circle Theater.

Abstract

All musical instruments rely on most, or all of the following elements: a power supply, an oscillator, a resonator, an amplifier, and a pitch control mechanism. Each of these elements will be discussed as they apply to string instruments, wood winds, brasses, percussion instruments and the piano. Each will be illustrated with performances by the Indianapolis New World Youth Symphony orchestra, conducted by its founder and artistic director Susan Kitterman. After the science introductions with orchestral illustrations, the evening will conclude with a performance by the orchestra.

Pre-Concert Tour

The Tutorial Concert will be preceded by a tour of Hilbert Circle Theater sponsored by TCAA. Prior to becoming the home of the Indianapolis Symphony, Hilbert Circle Theater was a movie house. It underwent major revisions to make it suitable as a concert hall. Since the last ASA meeting in Indianapolis in 1996, the concert hall has undergone additional major remodeling, mainly in the stage area, but also in the hall itself. The tour will begin at 6:00 p.m.

Hilbert Circle Theater is well within easy walking distance of the hotel, however, for the event of inclement weather, and for those with additional needs, limited bus transportation will be available.

Lecture Notes

Lecture notes will be distributed to all attending

 

Tutorial Lecture Preregistration

All Students (K – Grad school) will be admitted free of charge. General admission, for both, the general Public and ASA members is USD $15.00. Tickets available at the ASA Registration Desk and at the Hilbert Circle Theatre box office.

Short Course on Electroacoustic Transducers:
Fundamentals and Applications

SOLD OUT

The Short Course will be presented in two parts: Sunday, 26 October, 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Monday, 27 October, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Santa Fe Room.

Introduction

Transduction is a fascinating component of science and engineering.  As important as Signal processing and digital manipulation of data are, the transducer – the interface between the physical signal and its electronic copy – is a critical part of an acoustic-measurement or sound-projection system.  From measurement microphones and hydrophones to loudspeakers and underwater acoustic projectors, all transducers have limits: large-signal limits, small-signal limits, low-frequency limits, and high-frequency limits.  Furthermore, a receiving transducer affects the sound field and a transmitting transducer is affected by the medium.  Ignorance of these limits and effects leads to poor system design and mediocre performance; understanding these limits and effects results in predictable and reliable performance. This course will explore the fundamental behavior and actual performance of acoustic transducers – sensors and sources for air and for water – in conventional and unconventional applications.

Objective

The objectives are (1) to introduce the physical principles, basic performance, and system design aspects required for effective application of receiving and transmitting transducers and (2) to present common problems and potential solutions.

Instructor

Tom Gabrielson is a Senior Scientist and Professor of Acoustics at Penn State University and a Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America.  Prior to his employment at Penn State, he worked in underwater-acoustic transducer design, modeling, and measurement for 22 years at the Naval Air Warfare Center in Warminster, PA.  In 1996, he joined the Applied Research Laboratory at Penn State where he made a gradual transition to airborne acoustics.  His recent projects have included transducers for and measurements of high-amplitude jet noise, explosion blast waves, and long-range infrasound near the limits of detectability.  In addition to research, he teaches two courses for the Penn State Graduate Program in Acoustics: Acoustic Data Measurement and Electroacoustic Transducers.

Program

Sunday, 26 October 2014, 1:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Monday, 27 October 2014, 8:30 AM to 12:30 p.m.

Topics

     
 

1. Fundamentals

a.  Coupling: acoustical-to-electrical and electrical-to-acoustical
b. The performance envelope: low to high frequency; low to high amplitude
c.  Electric-field coupling: condenser microphones; piezoelectric transducers
d. Magnetic-field coupling: loudspeakers; magnetostrictive transducers

2. Frequency Response

a. Simple resonance – a common element of frequency response
b. The receiver: microphone/hydrophone basic response
c. The transmitter: loudspeaker/projector basic response
d. Low-frequency roll off e. Hacking the low-frequency response: techniques for compensation

3. Diffraction: How the Sensor Modifies the Sound Field

a. Acoustical size: wavelength, wave number
b. Diffraction and microphone orientation
c. “Free-field” and “pressure” response
d. Hydrophone diffraction
e. Hacking diffraction: techniques for compensation at high frequency

 

 

4. Small-Signal Limits: Receiving-Transducer Noise

a. Thermal-equilibrium noise
b. The two-component model for amplifier noise
c. Spectral density; noise-equivalent signal
d. Analog-to-digital converter noise
e. Microphone/hydrophone examples
f. Four practical methods for measurement of system noise
g. Wind and flow noise

 

5. Generating Sound

a. Acoustical size and radiation efficiency
b. The “simple” source and low-frequency generation in air and in water
c. Loudspeaker example
d. High-frequency; source directivity

6. Large-Signal Limits
a. Basic limits: self heating; displacement; stress
b. Piezoelectric action
c. Limits in piezoelectric power transducers
d. Nonlinearity and piezoelectric “jump”

7. Improving Efficiency and Increasing Power Output

a. The horn: an impedance transformer
b. Matching layers for ultrasonic transducers
c. Electrical impedance matching
d. Mutual radiation effects of nearby sources

8. Summary

     

 

Registration

The full registration fee is USD $300 (USD $125 USD for students) and covers attendance, instructional materials and coffee breaks. The number of attendees will be limited so please register early to avoid disappointment. Only those who have registered by 22 September will be guaranteed receipt of instruction materials. There will be a USD $50 discount off the full registration fee (discount does not apply to student fee) for registration made prior to 22 September. Any cancellations after 22 September will be charged a USD $25 processing fee. Register online at AcousticalSociety.org. If you miss the preregistration deadline and are interested in attending the course, please send an email to asa@aip.org.

Special Meeting Events and Features
See Information for Students section for student events 

ASA Resume Help Desk

Are you interested in applying for graduate school, a postdoctoral opportunity, a research scientist position, a faculty opening, or other position involving acoustics?  If you are, please stop by the ASA Resume Help Desk near the meeting registration booths.  Members of the ASA experienced in hiring will be available to look at your CV, cover letter, and research & teaching statements to provide tips and suggestions to help you most effectively present yourself in today's competitive job market.  The ASA Resume Help Desk will be staffed on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday during the lunch hour for walk-up meetings. Appointments during these three lunch hours will be available via a sign-up sheet, too.

Young Investigator Travel Grants

The Committee on Women in Acoustics (WIA) is sponsoring a Young Investigator Travel Grant to help with travel costs associated with presenting a paper at the Indianapolis meeting. Young professionals who have completed their doctorate in the past five years are eligible to apply if they plan to present a paper at the Indianapolis meeting, are not currently students, and have not previously received the award. Each award will be of the order of USD $450 with two awards anticipated. Awards will be presented by check at the WIA luncheon at the meeting. Both men and women may apply. Applicants should submit a request for support, a copy of the abstract for their presentation at the meeting, and a current resume/vita which includes information on their involvement in the field of acoustics and in the ASA. Submit materials by e-mail to Bonnie Schnitta bonnie@soundsense.com. Deadline for receipt of applications is 15 September 2014.

Plenary Session, ASA Annual Membership Meeting, Awards Ceremony

The ASA Plenary session will be held Wednesday, 29 October, in Marriott 5, where Society awards will be presented and recognition of newly-elected Fellows will be announced.

The Annual Membership meeting will be held on Wednesday, 29 October, in Marriott 5 at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel, 350 West Maryland Street, Indianapolis, IN 46225.

Accompanying Persons Program

Spouses and other visitors are welcome at the Indianapolis meeting. This program is self-organized but we provide a venue for you to meet and plan your days. The registration fee is USD $75 for preregistration by 22 September and USD $100 at the meeting. This gives you access to the social events on Tuesday and Thursday, the internet café/informal meeting room, the Jam Session, and also the Plenary Session on Wednesday afternoon.

A hospitality room for accompanying persons will be open at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Monday through Thursday in the Texas room. For updates about the accompanying persons program please check the ASA website at AcousticalSociety.org/meetings.html.

Note that the restaurant will be closed for the Women in Acoustics lunch on Wednesday, but should be open the rest of the week.

Visit: http://visitindy.com to learn about what is going on in Indianapolis. Good places to visit within walking distance include the Eiteljorg Museum (Tuesday night social venue), the Indiana State Museum (with IMAX) theater, the NCAA Hall of Champions, the Indianapolis Zoo, and White River State Park (you can hire bikes). Further away requiring transportation (taxi or bus - http://www.indygo.net/pages/system-map ) is the Indianapolis Speedway Museum which is at the Indy 500 track, the Children’s Museum, and the Indiana Museum of Art. Close to the hotel, there is the Circle Center Mall which is a great place for shopping.

Social Events

Tuesday Social at Eiteljorg Museum

Museum

Tuesday Social 6:00 pm Eiteljorg Museum of American Indian and Western Art

On Tuesday, October 28, at 6:00 p.m. the social will be held at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indian and Western art. First floor galleries will open for viewing art that promotes understanding of the history and cultures of North American people, including their contemporary Native art collection that has been ranked among the world’s best. In keeping with the Museum, the reception will feature a delectable array of food selections having a slightly Southwestern flair.The Eiteljorg is a 6-minute walk from the back of the Marriott and a shuttle will also be available.

Thursday Social and Halloween Fun

Thursday Social 6:00 pm

Halloween Themed

Costumes Encouraged

The Thursday social will take place on October 30 in the Marriott Ballroom at 6:00 p.m. with a Halloween theme. Costumes are positively encouraged, so don’t forget to pack one. Get ready for a few fun surprises organized by a team of young acousticians that are sure to provide some great photo ops. !

To set the stage, Halloween fun is included in a Thursday afternoon technical session sponsored by Architectural Acoustics and Speech Communication. Otherworldly minds offer 13 talks from 1:00 - 5:00p.m. in Marriott Ballroom 7-8. Come to learn about the acoustics of supernatural spirits, bumps in the night, eerie voices and other sorts of spooky audition.!

All Day - Every Day Break Room and Wed. Night Jam Session

Every Day Break Room and Wed. Night Jam Session

A unique feature of this ASA meeting is that a ballroom located directly opposite the registration booths will be dedicated as a central gathering area for discussion, wi-fi, coffee breaks, the Gallery of Acoustics and more. Join your colleagues the Break Room every day to discuss the latest ASA topics and news. Additionally, on Wednesday night from 8 pm until 12 am, once again the College of Fellows will be hosting the ASA Jam Session in the Break Room. Musicians and non-musicians are all enthusiastically welcome to attend. Bring your axe, sticks and/or voice. If you have a tune or two that you would like to perform, bring a sheet with lyrics and/or chords to share. A PA system and backline including guitars, bass, keyboard, drum set and monitors will be provided. All attendees will enjoy live music, a cash bar, and all-around good times. Don’t miss out!

Student Events

Monday 5:00 New Student Orientation

Monday 5:30 Student Meet and Greet

Wednesday 6:30 Student Reception

Each ASA meeting provides social activities for students including the Student Orientation and the Meet and Greet on Monday as well as the Student Reception on Wednesday. All students are encouraged to attend, especially students who are first time attendees or those from smaller universities Monday evening there will be an informal gathering in Break Room. From 5:00 to 5:30 there is a new Student Orientation. This is followed by the Student Meet and Greet from 5:30 - 6:45 for all students to learn about the flurry of activities and opportunities available for students at the Indianapolis ASA meeting. Refreshments and a cash bar will be available. Wednesday evening from 6:30 to 8:00 is the Student Reception.This event that offers an opportunity for students to meet informally with fellow students and other members of the Acoustical Society for a light dinner. The Student Council will be introduced and there are door prizes.

Women in Acoustics and Society Luncheon and Lecture

Wednesday 11:30 Women in Acoustics Luncheon

The Women in Acoustics luncheon will be held on Wednesday, 29 October. The luncheon sponsored by the Women in Acoustics Committee is part of their mission to foster a supportive atmosphere for women within the Society and within the scientific community at large. Everyone is welcome to attend. The fee is USD $30 (students USD $15) at the meeting.

Thursday 12:00 noon Society Luncheon and Lecture

A Society Luncheon and Lecture sponsored by the College of Fellows will be held Thursday, 30 October, at 12:00 noon. This luncheon is open to all attendees and their guests. Larry E. Humes, Distinguished Professor and Department Chair, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University will be our Society Luncheon Speaker. The title of his lecture is “Understanding the speech-understanding problems of older adults”. Professor Humes has over 150 scholarly publications on a variety of topics in audiology and hearing science and has served on the editorial boards of several audiology journals. Professor Humes is a Fellow of the International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA), the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), and the Acoustical Society of America. He received the Honors of the Association from ASHA in 2007 and in 2008, he received the James Jerger Career Award for Research in Audiology from the American Academy of Audiology. His most recent research activities have been focused on age-related changes in auditory perception, including speech-understanding ability, and on outcome measures for hearing aids. Prof. Humes is known for his captivating presentations and given that his research crosses many areas of science in ASA, this Society Lecture should be entertaining and enlightening. Tickets cost USD $30.00 each. Tickets for the Society Luncheon will be available at the meeting.

Transportation and Travel Information

Air Transportation

Indianapolis is served by many major airlines through Indianapolis International Airport (IND). Information is available at www.indianapolisairport.com. The airport terminal consists of one centralized check-in area with gates on two concourses A and B which are connected via walkways to each other as well as to the check-in and reception areas of the airport. You can easily walk from the terminal via an elevated walkway to the car rental desks, which are in the Ground Transportation Center. Also, located in the same area are the limos and ground transportation information desks.

Ground Transportation

Taxi: Taxis depart from just outside the baggage claim area on the ground floor of the terminal. There is a minimum charge of USD $15 for all taxis, whatever the distance travelled. Typical costs to downtown Indianapolis are USD $15 to USD $20. Driving time to reach the Downtown Marriott is about 30 minutes.

GO Green Line Airport Shuttle: The shuttle leaves the airport on the hour and the half hour from Zone #7 on the road just outside the Ground Transportation Center. The cost is USD $10 and takes about 36 minutes to reach the Marriott complex which includes the downtown Marriott (as well as Springhill Suites, the JW Marriott, Courtyard Marriott and Fairfield Inn). You can book online at goexpresstravel.com.

Bus service to and from the airport:IndyGo's Route 8 provides non-express, fixed-route service from the airport to downtown via stops along Washington Street. Cost is USD $1.75 per ride. For further information and route maps visit  http://www.indygo.net/maps-schedules/airport-service. The buses stop close to all the major downtown hotels. The stop at West and Washington is just northwest of the hotel. Pick-up stops are slightly different but still nearby. The stop at the airport is at Zone #6 on the road just outside the Ground Transportation Center.

Shared-ride and personal luxury limousine services: These transportation services are available.  Information desks are located in the Ground Transportation Center. A list of limousine companies can be found at www.indianapolisairport.com.

Rental Car: Renting a car is not recommended unless you are planning trips out of town. Most everything you need should be within walking distance of the hotel. There are a lot of very nice restaurants, museums and shops reasonably close to the hotel. If you do need a rental car, the desks are located in the Ground Transportation Center on the 1st floor (ground level) of the parking garage. Alamo, Avis, Budget, Dollar, Enterprise, Hertz, National, and Thrifty all have desks at the airport and ACE has an off-airport location with a shuttle service to and from the airport, pick up just outside the Ground Transportation Center.

Bus and Train Transportation to Downtown Indianapolis

Amtrak and Greyhound both serve Indianapolis and the train and bus stations are within walking distance of the conference hotel. However, trains to do not run very often, e.g., one a day from Chicago to Indianapolis., versus seven a day Greyhound buses from Chicago to Indianapolis. The Amtrak station is at 350 S. Illinois Street a 10-minute walk (0.5 miles) from the Marriott and the Greyhound Station is next to the Amtrak station at 154 W. South St. See www.greyhound.com and tickets.amtrak.com for more information.

Getting Around Indianapolis

Taxis or the bus system can be used to travel in Indianapolis. Single ride fares are USD $1.75 and a day pass costs USD $4.00. Visit the INDYGO site at www.indygo.net for more information on the bus services.

Downtown Indy Map

Driving/Parking Information

Indianapolis Interstates:  The ring road around Indianapolis is I-456. Connecting and crossing with this ring road are I-65 (Chicago–Indianapolis–Louisville), I-70 (Saint Louis–Indianapolis–Columbus), I-74 (Urbana-Champaign–Indianapolis– Cincinnati), and I-69 (Lansing–Fort Wayne–Indianapolis).

Features of the area around the hotel:The Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, the meeting hotel, is located at 350 West Maryland Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46225. It is opposite the Indiana Convention Center which is to the south of the Marriott. Maryland Street is one-way to the east on the south side of the Marriott (main entrance), and to the north of the Marriott is Washington Street which is one-way west. Close by, to the northwest of the meeting hotel, on Washington Street across West Street (a north-south avenue), is the distinctive tall blue glass tower, home of the JW Marriott. The JW Marriott is opposite the White River State Park, which houses museums and other tourist attractions.

All directions will take you to West Maryland Street from, or crossing, South West Street. At this point you need to be in the left hand lane because you will need to take the first left onto Missouri Street to access parking under the hotel which will be on your right. If you are dropping someone off, take the driveway immediately after Missouri Street on your left at the front of the Marriott.

From the North traveling south on I-65:  Take exit 114 on I-65 toward Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Street which merges into N. West Street as you travel south. After just over a mile you will pass Washington Street and then you will need to make a left turn onto Maryland St, keeping in the left hand lane once you have turned.

From the South traveling north on I-65:  Take the S Missouri St exit in Indianapolis and then take exit 79A from I-70 W (As you can tell from these directions, you will spend only a short time on I-70 going west before turning north on Missouri St.)  After passing the Lucas Oil Stadium, Missouri curves around the west side of the Indiana Convention Center and merges with S. West Street. You will then immediately take the first right on to W. Maryland Street, getting into the far left lane.

From the West traveling east on I-70: Take the S Missouri St exit in center, (exit 79A) going north on S Missouri Street which merges with S. West Street,  but immediately after this you go right on W. Maryland St moving to the left hand lane.

From the East traveling west on I-70:  In downtown Indianapolis merge on to I-65 North (which means continuing to go west as I-70 dips to the south, exit 83B) and then take exit 114 toward Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Street which merges into N. West Street as you go south. After just over a mile you will pass Washington Street and then you will need to make a left turn onto Maryland St, keeping in the left hand lane once you have turned.

From the North East  traveling south/southwest on I-69:  The simplest way is to go around I-465 to the west of Indianapolis and then at exit 44 take I-70 West. Take exit 83B to I-65 North to Exit 114 which will take you south on Martin Luther King Jr. which merges into N West Street as you go south. After crossing Washington Street, turn left on Maryland Street into the left-most lane.

From Urbana-Champaign traveling east on I-74: Follow I-74 to Rockville Road in Indianapolis. You will merge with I-465 south and then take exit 13 to travel east on Rockville Road. Rockville Road merges onto S. Washington Street (which is two-way at this point). As you get closer to the hotel and downtown Indianapolis, you will see the zoo to your left, and then cross the river with the White River State Park to your left. Washington Street going east merges onto W. Maryland Street. Make sure you are in the left lane as you cross S West Street.

Parking: Parking options for Conference attendees include:  Hotel valet parking; hotel self-parking and night and weekend parking in a parking garage conveniently located across from the hotel. Valet parking is located at the front entrance of the hotel on West Maryland Street. Guests who wish to self-park can utilize the Marriott Garage below the hotel. Daily valet parking rates are USD $36. Daily parking for self-parking is USD $31 or USD $10/hour. In addition, the Marriott Downtown is located directly across from the Indiana Government Center Garage, where guests will find convenient parking, connected via skywalk to the hotel. This garage is open to the public on evenings and weekends. Prices are hourly, and based on the length of time in the garage.

Weather and Indianapolis Information

Weather in Indianapolis in the last week in October can vary a lot from year to year. Make sure you are prepared for rain so you can take full advantage of nearby restaurants and attractions. See http://visitindy.com and the hotel website http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel-guide/indcc-indianapolis-marriott-... for more information about Indianapolis. There is a 35% chance of some sort of precipitation (rain) and snow is very rare at that time of year. Average low and high temperatures at that time of year are 41 and  60 degrees F, respectively.

Hotel Reservation Information

A block of guest rooms at discounted rates has been reserved for meeting participants at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel. Early reservations are strongly recommended. Note that the special ASA meeting rates are not guaranteed after Wednesday, 24 September 2014. You must mention the Acoustical Society of America when making your reservations to obtain the special ASA meeting rates.

Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel

Please make your reservation directly with the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel. [There are three Marriott hotels in Indianapolis so please insure that you make your reservation at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel.] When making your reservation, you must mention the Acoustical Society of America to obtain the special ASA rates. The hotel address and phone numbers are as follows, but please make reservations as described below.

Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel
350 West Maryland Street
Indianapolis, IN  46225

Reservations can be made directly online at the website listed below, which has been set up specifically for the Acoustical Society of America where the meeting rates and all applicable information is incorporated. If you wish to make a reservation via telephone please use the special reservations phone number also listed below.

Reservation Procedures

Online Reservations

https://resweb.passkey.com/go/AcousticalSociety2014

Telephone Reservations

Marriott Group Reservations – 1-800-266-9432

In order to obtain the hotel room rate negotiated for ASA attendees, inform the reservations staff person that you are attending the Acoustical Society of America Conference.

Room Rates

Single/Double/Triple/Quad: USD $169.00

All rooms are subject to a 17% state and local occupancy taxes

Reservation cut-off date: midnight 9 October 2014 (EST)

Room Sharing

ASA will compile a list of those who wish to share a hotel room and its cost. To be listed, send your name, telephone number, e-mail address, gender, smoker or nonsmoker preference, not later than 1 September 2014 to the Acoustical Society of America, by e-mail, asa@aip.org. The responsibility for completing any arrangements for room sharing rests solely with the participating individuals.

General Information

Assistive Listening Devices

Anyone planning to attend the meeting who will require the use of an assistive listening device, is requested to advise the Society in advance of the meeting:  Acoustical Society of America, Suite 1NO1, 2 Huntington Quadrangle, Melville, NY 11747-4502, asa@aip.org.

Photography and Recording

Photographing and recording during regular sessions are not permitted without prior permission from the Acoustical Society.

Registration Information

The registration desk at the meeting will open on Monday, 27 October, at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel. Register online at AcousticalSociety.org. If your registration is not received at the ASA headquarters by 22 September you must register on-site. All amounts are in USD.                                                                                                     

Registration Fees

  Registration fees are as follows: Preregistration by   Onsite Registration
  Category   22 September   
  Acoustical Society Members $470 $545
  Acoustical Society Members One-Day Attendance*     $235 $275
  Nonmembers  $570 $645
  Nonmembers One-Day Attendance* $285                               $325
  Nonmember Invited Speakers One-Day Attendance*       Fee waived Fee waived
  Nonmember Invited Speaker-(Includes one-year ASA membership upon completion of an application) $110    $110   
  ASA Early Career  Members - (ASA members within 3 years of their most recent degrees - proof of date of degree rquired) $235     $275    
  ASA Student Members (with current ID cards)      $50    $90  
  Nonmember Students (with current ID cards)    $90    $130
  Nonmember Undergraduate Students (with current ID cards indicating undergraduate status)  $75   $115
  ASA Emeritus Members (Emeritus status pre-approved by ASA) $125 $150 
  Accompanying Persons (Registrants who will not participate in the technical sessions)      $125   $150  

Nonmembers who register for the full meeting week and simultaneously apply for Associate Membership in the Acoustical Society of America will be given a USD $50 discount off their dues payment for the first year (2015) of membership. Invited speakers who are members of the Acoustical Society of America are expected to pay the registration fee, but nonmember invited speakers may register for one-day only without charge. A nonmember invited speaker who pays the full-week registration fee, will be given one free year of membership upon completion of an ASA application form.

NOTE: A USD $25 FEE WILL BE CHARGED FOR CANCELLATIONS AFTER 22 SEPTEMBER.

ONLINE REGISTRATION

Online registration is available at AcousticalSociety.org.

*One-day registration is for participants who will attend the meeting for only one day. If you will be at the meeting for more than one day either presenting a paper and/or attending sessions, you must register and pay the full registration fee.

 

INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS

Follow the student Twitter; @ASAStudents

Student Transportation Subsidies

 

A student transportation subsidies fund has been established to provide limited funds to students to partially defray transportation expenses to meetings. Students presenting papers who propose to travel in groups using economical ground transportation will be given first priority to receive subsidies, although these conditions are not mandatory. No reimbursement is intended for the cost of food or housing. The amount granted each student depends on the number of requests received. To apply for a subsidy, submit a proposal by e-mail to be received by 22 September 2014 to: Jolene Ehl, jehl@aip.org. The proposal should include your status as a student; whether you have submitted an abstract; whether you are a member of ASA; method of travel; if traveling by auto; whether you will travel alone or with other students; names of those traveling with you; and approximate cost of transportation.

Students Meet Members for Lunch

The ASA Education Committee arranges for a student to meet one-on-one with a member of the Acoustical Society over lunch. The purpose is to make it easier for students to meet and interact with members at ASA Meetings. Each lunch pairing is arranged separately. Students who are interested should contact Dr. David Blackstock, University of Texas at Austin, by email dtb@austin.utexas.edu Please provide your name, university, department, degree you are seeking (BS, MS, or PhD), research field, acoustical interests, your supervisor's name, days you are free for lunch, and abstract number (or title) of any paper(s) you are presenting. The sign-up deadline is 12 days before the start of the meeting, but an earlier sign-up is strongly encouraged. Each participant pays for his/her own meal.

ASA Resume Help Desk

Are you interested in applying for graduate school, a postdoctoral opportunity, a research scientist position, a faculty opening, or other position involving acoustics?  If you are, please stop by the ASA Resume Help Desk near the meeting registration booths.  Members of the ASA experienced in hiring will be available to look at your CV, cover letter, and research & teaching statements to provide tips and suggestions to help you most effectively present yourself in today's competitive job market.  The ASA Resume Help Desk will be staffed on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday during the lunch hour for walk-up meetings. Appointments during these three lunch hours will be available via a sign-up sheet, too.

New Students Orientation and Meet and Greet

A New Students Orientation will be held from 5:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Monday, 27 October, in Marriott 9/10 for all students to learn about the activities and opportunities available for students at the Indianapolis ASA meeting. This will be followed by the Student Meet and Greet from 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. in Marriott 6. Refreshments and a cash bar will be available. Students are encouraged to attend the tutorial lecture on which begins at 7:00 p.m. in The Hilbert Theater. Student registration for this event is free.

Students Reception

The Students’ Reception will be held on Wednesday, 29 October, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. in Indiana E. This reception, sponsored by the Acoustical Society of America and supported by the National Council of Acoustical Consultants, will provide an opportunity for students to meet informally with fellow students and other members of the Acoustical Society. All students are encouraged to attend, especially students who are first time attendees or those from smaller universities. Students will find a sticker to place on their name tags identifying them as students in their registration envelopes. Although wearing the sticker is not mandatory, it will allow for easier networking between students and other meeting attendees. Students are encouraged to refer to the student guide, also found in their envelopes, for important program and meeting information pertaining only to students attending the ASA meeting. They are also encouraged to visit the official ASA Student Home Page at www.acosoc.org/student/ to learn more about student involvement in ASA.

International Student Challenge Problem in Acoustic Signal Processing - Entry Deadline has passed.

The Acoustical Society of America Technical Committee on Signal Processing in Acoustics is sponsoring an International Student Challenge Problem in Acoustic Signal Processing. This problem presents a real-world signal processing challenge encountered in the field of acoustics. It is intended to be easily understood by students with a basic understanding of signal processing. A unique solution to the Student Challenge Problem is not expected. Students are encouraged to explore various approaches. Submissions will be judged on clarity, creativity, rigor, and insight. The competition is open to both undergraduate and graduate students.

Cash awards of USD $500 and USD $250 will be awarded to the first and second place winners, respectively.  Winners are also invited (but not required) to prepare and present a 4’ x 8’ poster at the 168th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Indianapolis, Indiana, 27-31, October 2014. Limited support is available for travel to the meeting to the winning entrants.

The Problem

Background. A truck with a 4-stroke diesel engine travels along a straight road with constant speed. Near the road is a microphone that senses the radiated acoustic noise from the truck during its passage past the microphone. The output of the microphone is sampled at the rate of 12,000 samples/second and 30 seconds of data are recorded during the truck’s transit. During the recording of the data, the speed of sound propagation in air was a constant 347 m/s.

Problem:  Assuming that the truck is a point source,

  • Plot the spectrogram of the acoustic data file truck.wav.(right-click to download and "save file as")
  • Given that the strongest spectral line is the engine firing rate, calculate the truck’s
  • engine firing rate (in Hz),
  • cylinder firing rate (in Hz),
  • number of cylinders,
  • tachometer reading (in revolutions/minute),
  • speedometer reading (speed in km/hour),
  • distance (in meters) of the closest point of approach of the truck to the sensor,
  • time (in seconds) at which the closest point of approach occurs.

Your solution should detail your approach and reasoning to solve the problem, as well as your best estimates of the above parameters.

Entry Requirements and Deadline Dates
Send your solutions to asa@aip.org by 31 July 2014 with the subject line “Student Challenge Problem Entry.”
Submissions should be electronic and in MS Word or PDF format. Your entry should include your name, preferred postal mailing address, e-mail address and mobile phone number.

Entries must be accompanied by proof of the entrant’s status as a university student, e.g., current student ID card or letter from the university confirming student status.  Entrants need not be members of the ASA. Winners will be selected by a panel appointed by the Chair of the Technical Committee on Signal Processing in Acoustics.
Entrants will be notified by of the competition results by 30 September 2014. Attendance at the ASA fall 2014 meeting is not required to participate.

By entering this competition you are granting ASA the right to post your answer on any of its web sites including, but not limited to, AcousticalSociety.org and AcousticsToday.org.

168th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America

Local Committee

  General Co-chairs   Kenneth J. de Jong, Patricia Davies
  Technical Program Chair   Robert F. Port
  Local Conference Secretariat   Mary C. Morgan
  Food and Beverage   Diane Kewley-Port, Tessa Bent, Mary C. Morgan
  Audio Visual and WIFI   Mary C. Morgan, Kai Ming Li, Tom Lorenzen
  Volunteer Coordination   Caroline Richie
  Signs   Mary C. Morgan
  Technical Tours   William J. Murphy
  Educational Activities, Tutorials   Uwe Hansen
  Special Events   Diane Kewley-Port, Chuck Watson
  Ongoing Activities at the Meeting   James Miller
  Indianapolis Visitor Information   Maria Kondaurova, Guanguan Li
  Student Activities   Tessa Bent

Technical Program Organizing Committee

   
  Robert F. Port, Chair
  David R. Dowling, Acoustical Oceanography
  Roderick J. Suthers, Animal Bioacoustics
  Norman H. Philipp, Architectural Acoustics
  Robert J. McGough, Biomedical Acoustics
  Uwe J. Hansen, Education in Acoustics
  Roger T. Richards, Engineering Acoustics
  Andrew C.H. Morrison, Musical Acoustics
  William J. Murphy, Noise
  Kai Ming Li, Physical Acoustics
  Jennifer Lentz, Psychological and Physiological Acoustics
  R. Lee Culver, Signal Processing in Acoustics
  Cameron Fackler Signal Processing in Acoustics
  Diane Kewley-Port, Speech Communication
  Alexander L. Francis, Speech Communication
  Benjamin M. Shafer, Structural Acoustics and Vibration
  Kevin L. Williams, Underwater Acoustics